Blog Archives

Cellos Rule at Studio Trilogy in San Francisco

Pictured at Studio Trilogy in San Francisco are (L-R) cellists Meta Weiss, Joan Jeanrenaud and David Requiro. Photo by David Goggin.

Pictured at Studio Trilogy in San Francisco are (L-R) cellists Meta Weiss, Joan Jeanrenaud and David Requiro. Photo by David Goggin.

San Francisco, December 2015 – Studio Trilogy recently hosted multiple recording sessions with three world-renowned cellists.  Former Kronos Quartet cellist Joan Jeanrenaud has just wrapped up her new album, “Visual Music,” as well as producing the debut album of the duo of Meta Weiss and David Requiro.

Jeanrenaud’s album was co-produced with her longtime collaborator PC Muñoz, who also co-produced her previous albums, “Strange Toys” and “Pop-Pop.” The new album is comprised of 17 pieces composed and performed by Jeanrenaud to accompany dance, art works and other visual presentations over the past five years. Percussionist Muñoz also performs on the new album, which was engineered by Trilogy’s Justin Lieberman.

“PC Muñoz and I work together frequently with Justin,” Jeanrenaud commented. Over all these years, Justin and I have established a special rapport, a working relationship that is really good to have, and I value it so much. It’s so great to have an engineer who really becomes a collaborator as the work unfolds in the studio.”

Joan Jeanrenaud plays a Deconet cello made in the mid-1700s.  A native of Memphis, Tennessee, she played with the Kronos Quartet from 1978 until 1999, when, after a sabbatical, she left to pursue a solo career and collaborations with other artists. “Visual Music” will be mastered by Bernie Grundman for early 2016 release on the Deconet Records label.

In addition to completing hew new album, Jeanrenaud was also at Trilogy producing a new album of classical and contemporary compositions performed by esteemed cellists Meta Weiss and David Requiro. Trilogy’s Justin Lieberman engineered this project as well.

“I know Meta because I gave her cello lessons from age 13-15,” recalls Jeanrenaud.  “Since then she has gone on to do some great things and is almost finished with her doctorate degree from Julliard.  She has known David Requiro for many years and the two are getting married next year. Judging from the way they play together, it seems to be a match made in heaven.” The duo regularly performs together at prestigious festivals and concerts.

The new album from Weiss and Requiro includes: J. S. Bach “Chaconne” (from the violin Partita in D minor arranged for two cellos); Niccolo Paganini ‘Variations on One String on a theme by Rossini’ (arranged for two cellos); Giovanni Sollima “The Shooting,” “Il Pino,” “Il Tasso,” and “Le Sequoia”; Jean-Paul Borremanne “A Due Celli,” and Joan Jeanrenaud “Oulipo.”

San Francisco native Meta Weiss made her international debut at the age of seven in Utrecht, Holland at the International String Convention. An acclaimed soloist, chamber musician, and artist, she performs music spanning all periods from classical to jazz. Her performances have taken her to venues throughout the US and internationally, including Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center, Boston Symphony Hall, The Kimmel Center, Royal Albert Hall, and Teatro Britanico (Peru). Weiss performs on a Gioffredo Cappa cello, c. 1690, generously provided for her by an anonymous supporter

David Requiro has emerged as one of today’s most promising young cellists. He has soloed with the Tokyo Philharmonic, National Symphony Orchestra, Seattle Symphony, and other orchestras across the U.S. Requiro is currently Artist in Residence at the University of Puget Sound where he is professor of cello and director of the chamber music program.

Read more →

Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel at Studio Trilogy

Pictured at Studio Trilogy in San Francisco is the Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel. Trilogy engineer Willie Samuels is on the far left; bandleader/drummer Brian Andres is third from the right.

Pictured at Studio Trilogy in San Francisco is the Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel. Trilogy engineer Willie Samuels is on the far left; bandleader/drummer Brian Andres is third from the right.

San Francisco, CA, November 2015 — San Francisco’s popular Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel, led by drummer Brian Andres, has completed their third album, “This Could Be That,” with the majority of sessions recorded at Studio Trilogy with engineer Willie Samuels.

The album is the Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel’s third recording, scheduled for a January 15th, 2016 release. A continuation of the hard hitting, modern Latin Jazz sound they’ve become known for, it features special guests Alex Acuna, Venissa Santi, John Santos, Louie Romero, Michael Spiro, Calixto Oviedo, Jesus Florido and Brian’s father, Mike Andres.

Listen to a song preview:

https://soundcloud.com/brian-andres-4/esto-puede-ser-eso-this-could-be-that

“Studio Trilogy was recommended to me by producer Greg Landau,” explains bandleader Brian Andres. “He felt that I would benefit from more ‘air’ in this new album and thought recording live as much as possible would be best, as would having the right room sound.  Thankfully, Studio Trilogy met all of those needs.  From the initial communication with studio manager Cindy McSherry, to the actual lay out of the studio and its amenities, to the exceptional engineering by Willie Samuels and his crew, the experience was awesome.”

The San Francisco Bay Area is renowned as an historic hotbed for Latin Jazz artists. From Cal Tjader to Armando Peraza, John Santos to Wayne Wallace, the Latin jazz tradition has thrived in the Bay Area, and it is from this tradition that The Afro-Cuban Jazz Cartel emerged. Lead by drummer Brian Andres, the group was formed to contribute its own mark to that storied history.

Featuring Grammy Award-winning musicians, as well as popular music educators, the ACJC repertoire consists of original compositions as well as dynamic original arrangements of classics from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico and the United States.  The group presents both dance and concert performances, as well as educational presentations such as lectures, workshops and instruction focused on the musical instrumentation, composition and arranging of the rich Afro-Cuban genre.

Released in 2007, the ACJC’s first album, “Drummer’s Speak,” established the solid reputation of the group. In 2013, the ACJC released its second recording, “San Francisco.”  Focusing on the composing, arranging and performing talent of the SF Bay Area Latin Jazz scene, the recording debuted on the CMJ Jazz Top 40 at number 39. Eventually climbing to number 23, it was met with critical acclaim while staying on the CDBaby Best Selling list for 4 months.

More info: http://www.brianandres.com/afro-cuban-jazz-cartel

 

Read more →

Guerilla Composers Ensemble at Studio Trilogy in SF

Pictured at Studio Trilogy are (L-R) Noah Killeen, Trilogy assistant engineer; Edward Hong, drums and percussion; Bridget Pasker, cello; Zach Miley, recording engineer; Steve Horowitz, composer/producer; Jonathan Szin, clarinet; Britton Day, piano; Abigail Shiman, violin; Christy Kim, flute, Nick Benavides, conductor and director.  Photo by David Goggin.

Pictured at Studio Trilogy are (L-R) Noah Killeen, Trilogy assistant engineer; Edward Hong, drums and percussion; Bridget Pasker, cello; Zach Miley, recording engineer; Steve Horowitz, composer/producer; Jonathan Szin, clarinet; Britton Day, piano; Abigail Shiman, violin; Christy Kim, flute, Nick Benavides, conductor and director. Photo by David Goggin.

San Francisco, CA, August 2015 – Steve Horowitz and the Guerrilla Composers Ensemble assembled at Studio Trilogy in San Francisco to record “The Ribbon of Extremes,” an instrumental work by Horowitz, inspired by the 1932 painting of the same name by the Surrealist painter Yves Tanguy.

Horowitz explained the origins of his composition and how it was recorded at Trilogy, “The Ribbon of Extremes is a surrealist masterpiece. Imaginary figures and unreal objects unfold in space and time inside a puffy cloud of musical nightmares. In fact, a lot of the figures in the painting look like strange creatures playing instruments. That was the original inspiration — what would they sound like?”

On the subject of recording, he continued, “Studio Trilogy is the perfect setting for this group and this instrumentation. Lot’s of great microphones, comfortable rooms, high-end analog consoles and a world-class piano. Studio manager Cindy McSherry and the entire staff are amazing — they make you feel completely at home and are on top of the details, so you can concentrate on the music.”

Horowitz is a creator of odd but accessible sounds and a diverse and prolific musician, perhaps best known for his original score for the award-winning film “Super Size Me” and 18 highly imaginative albums.

”The Ribbon of Extremes” features a large percussion set up, played expertly by percussionist Eddie Hong and features complex interactions of piano, cello, violin, clarinet, and flute. “Eddie is playing everything from the drum set to vibes on this recording and the trap set part is not easy; it is a very intricate feature and needs to blend with the rest of the ensemble at all times,” Horowitz explains. “This takes absolute timing and incredible focus. Eddie plays with a lot of control — think Franks Zappa’s ‘Black Page’ played on Mars. We also had the great privilege of working with recording engineer Zach Miley on this project. Zach has huge ears and really helped to define and shape the final mixes.”

”The Ribbon of Extremes” is set for release September 4, with the CD set to be available shortly thereafter. Visit: http://www.thecodeinternational.com

Read more →

Studio Trilogy Hosts Bay Area “Kentucky Derby Race for a Cure”

Pictured at Studio Trilogy in the lounge and live room are attendees at the “Kentucky Derby Race for a Cure” fundraiser.

Pictured at Studio Trilogy in the lounge and live room are attendees at the “Kentucky Derby Race for a Cure” fundraiser.

San Francisco, CA, May 2015 – Studio Trilogy in San Francisco recently donated studio space and sponsored the “Kentucky Derby Race for a Cure” fundraiser. Attendees packed the studio and watched the televised Kentucky Derby, known as the “The Fastest Two Minutes in Sports.” Event organizer John Clamme is one of 20 men and women in the Bay Area competing to be named “Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Man & Woman of the Year.”

Each year, in communities across the country, passionate candidates engage in an exciting competition to earn the title by raising funds for LLS blood cancer research. The candidates compete in honor of children who are local blood cancer survivors, the Boy & Girl of the Year.

Every dollar counts as one vote and the titles are awarded to the man and woman with the most votes at the end of ten weeks. The top local fundraisers in the country win the national titles. To date, these dedicated leaders have helped LLS invest more than $1 billion in research to advance breakthrough therapies that are saving lives today and helping us all achieve the LLS goal of a world without blood cancers. http://www.mwoy.org/

Read more →

Glenn Mack’s “Brujo” Film Scores at Studio Trilogy

Pictured (L-R) at Studio Trilogy are PC Muñoz and Jean Jeanrenaud recording a Vivaldi variation for “Brujo.”

Pictured (L-R) at Studio Trilogy are PC Muñoz and Joan Jeanrenaud recording a Vivaldi variation for “Brujo.”

San Francisco, CA, November 2014 – Director Glenn Mack’s feature directorial debut, “Brujo,” is currently in post-production with scoring sessions recorded at San Francisco’s Studio Trilogy by chief engineer/co-manager Justin Lieberman.  “It was PC Muñoz who suggested Trilogy,” commented Mack.  “He’s done a lot of work there and our sessions for the film were terrific, absolutely top-of-the-line.”

San Francisco-based PC Muñoz is known for genre-defying productions that stretch the boundaries of classical, funk, hip-hop, and the avant-garde. Muñoz’s past production projects include the Grammy-nominated 2008 album “Strange Toys” by cellist Joan Jeanrenaud and the award-winning multi-media project “Twenty Haiku.” His work has been praised by NPR, Performing Songwriter, DownBeat, URB, and many others. 

Mack had been using a classical recording of Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” as a temp score for the film and went to Muñoz for a new recording.  “When I do interpretations, I always pretty much radically reimagine them,” explained Muñoz. “I said I’d like to do something completely different, almost render it in a jazzy style. I suggested to him that we do a drum set and cello rendering.”

“Brujo” (Spanish for sorcerer) revolves around the activity at a modern dance workshop. The story traces the arc of jealousy to its disastrous result and, at the same time, chronicles the creative intensity of artists coming together to collaborate on a project.

Muñoz met at Trilogy with former Kronos Quartet cellist Joan Jeanrenaud.  “We brought Joan in, had a brief discussion about it. Here’s the Vivaldi, we both know it, but we’re not going to try and play it as a strictly classical piece. We’re going to do it the way we do the music that we usually create. We talked a little bit about switching the time signatures and the kind of pulse it would have. Fortunately, for that session, Glenn was there. He’s super great to work with, just wanted to make sure that the vibe was right for his picture.” 

Muñoz describes the session: “We had the picture there on the big screen and just ran through the different ideas that we had for the arrangement until we landed on something, especially in terms of the drums, because obviously, there are no tracks of drums on the original Vivaldi. I had to figure out a way to make it rhythmically cool, and also useful for the scene, and something that Glenn would dig. We just sat there and knocked out a few takes.”

“The way Joan and I often work is with a beat that I make either acoustically or electronically,” Muñoz continued. “In this case it was all acoustic, and then Joan started to layer different cello parts — some rhythmic stuff, some long, legato stuff, some pretty stuff, and some stuff that evoked different types of moods for the scene. We also worked closely with sound designer Chris McGrew, who was there for that session, as well.”

After the tracks were completed and sent off to post-production to be mixed into the film, Muñoz commented on working at Studio Trilogy.  “It’s by far my favorite place to work in San Francisco, probably my favorite in California. It’s a fantastic studio – Justin Lieberman and Willie Samuels are great engineers, Cindy McSherry is a great studio manager, and they are always, always ready for whatever I’m looking for. I like looking for distinct and unusual situations in a musical context, and they’re always ready to go there with me.”

To learn more about “Brujo” : visit: http://brujothemovie.com/

Read more →

Future Youth Records Mission Girls at Studio Trilogy

Pictured (L-R) at Studio Trilogy are students Mariacel Gutierrez and Kianna Farr-Zunig, FYR founder Jason Wall, singer Thia Megia, engineer Tyler Crowder, songwriter/producer Ben Thompson, and composer/producer/multi-instrumentalist Mo Pleasure.

Pictured (L-R) at Studio Trilogy are students Mariacel Gutierrez and Kianna Farr-Zunig, FYR founder Jason Wall, singer Thia Megia, engineer Tyler Crowder, songwriter/producer Ben Thompson, and composer/producer/multi-instrumentalist Mo Pleasure.

San Francisco, CA, September 2014 – Future Youth Records, which has a long-term association with San Francisco’s Studio Trilogy, has completed a preliminary chapter of the Mission Girls Remonstrance Project.  Spearheaded by FYR founder and producer Jason Wall, the project aims to create music that rallies against songs and videos that objectify and degrade women in the hip-hop music community.

“We started out by creating an original song and music video that will be used to inspire and empower young women,” explained Jason Wall.  “At the same time, this will serve to educate Bay Area residents about the growing problem of disesteem towards women in this musical community.” 

“When we first came together on this partnership,” commented Mission Girls’ director Susana Rojas, “We expected to get a song out of it and for the girls to be exposed to a new field in a professional way.  Mission Girls not only got the song and the exposure but so much more.  Through this partnership we were able to build empowerment for our girls by hearing their own voices and without a doubt   claiming that they are now rising up.”

Successful musicians who came to Studio Trilogy for the sessions included Morris Pleasure (Michael Jackson, David Foster), Nathan East’s brother Marcel East (Phil Collins, Phillip Bailey), and Thia Megia (Amercian Idol).

The long-range goal of the project is provide ten at-risk young women from the Mission Girls Services organization (MGS) with the tools and platform to draw awareness to the growing problem of women degradation and exploitation in rap and hip-hop music.  Each participant will write and record one original song and produce a music video alongside professional songwriters, engineers and filmmakers.

The initial song produced at Studio Trilogy to launch the project was “Rise Up.“  “A couple of weeks after we finished,” recalled Jason Wall, “Susan Rojas, the director, told me that one of the girls was suicidal the week before coming into our program and through it was able to overcome those feelings and now wants to help other girls who feel the same way she felt.”

The proposed project will run March 3 – 27, 2015.  Participants will work over a four-week period to write and record one original song at Studio Trilogy and spend two additional weeks creating a professional music video in San Francisco.  Participants along with FYR and MGS will work with local merchants to secure physical distribution of free download cards.  High profile musicians Dr Fink (Prince & The Revolution) & Marcel East are already confirmed to act as mentors. 

To learn more about Future Youth Records, visit:

http://futureyouthrecords.org

Read more →